Grafting Tomatoes – A Beginner’s Guide

Types of Grafts One of the simplest grafts is a top graft. Mefferd recommends working with small plants, which might be only 2 to 3 inches tall, not only to fit the silicone grafting clip size but to increase success. Choose a rootstock plant and scion that are nearly identical in stem diameter. Carefully cut the rootstock plant at approximately a 35-degree angle with a razor, and discard the top. Using the same angle, slice off the top of the scion. Some people pinch off several of the scion’s leaves…

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America’s Best Homemade Tomato Sauce

If you’re buying jarred tomato sauce because it’s more convenient than making the real stuff, stop right now. Despite what you might think, you don’t need a long list of ingredients or an entire afternoon of free time. This recipe, borrowed from Patsy’s Italian Restaurant in New York City, will have you saying goodbye to the supermarket sauce aisle for good.Patsy’s has been churning out its famous red sauce since 1944 and is a favorite among celebrities, including Frank Sinatra and JFK. The family recipe utilizes canned San Marzano tomatoes,…

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Rhizoctonia on Tomato Plants

Rhizoctonia rot Rhizoctonia solani is common in most soils and is able to cause some form of disease in almost all cultivated plants. Different ‘strains’ of R. solani, called anastomosis groups, have been recognized. The anastomosis groups differ in their host range and pathogenicity.The most common diseases are damping-off of seedlings, root and stem rots, stem cankers and fruit rot. The diseases often have common names that describe symptoms on the particular host, for example base rot of lettuce, black scurf of potato tubers, crater rot of beetroot, and wire…

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Caring for Tomatoes at Mid-season

Giving tomato plants the proper attention at planting time is the most important step you can take to ensuring a satisfying harvest. However, even with the best care initially, keeping your tomatoes growing strong will require some mid-season care as they head toward harvest time. Controlling Disease Once the plants start to flower and form new tomatoes, keep an eye out for leaf spot or leaf curl on the plant. Another sign of trouble is leaf drop or yellowing leaves. Unfortunately, many diseases common to tomatoes look similar. Some are…

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Lots Of Flowers And No Tomatoes

Are you getting tomato plant blossoms but no tomatoes? When a tomato plant is not producing, it can leave you at a loss as to what to do. Several factors can lead to a lack of fruit setting, such as temperature, irregular watering practices, and poor growing conditions. You don’t need two plants in order to produce fruit either—this is a popular misconception. Big Blooms but No Tomatoes on the Tomato Plant Lush Foliage but No Tomatoes If you’re troubled with lots of lush foliage on your tomato plants but can’t seem…

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Gazpacho Granita

How quickly water freezes determines the size of the ice crystals that form—slower means larger. In this granita, where all of the flavors of gazpacho are crystallized into a frosty form, putting the liquid in a shallow pan helps to speed up the freezing, keeping the crystals relatively small. Even so, if left undisturbed, the crystals would solidify into one large, aggregated collection of ice crystals—an ice block, which would be impossible to serve. Stirring the surface prevents the individual ice crystals from conglomerating, so the granita stays deliciously spoonable.…

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